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So who's seeing rose rosette disease?


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#1 Janet Macunovich

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 10:39 PM

We've just posted our photos of some summer symptoms of this lethal disease in a What's Up article.

For more, including photos of the very noticeable spring symptoms, we can recommend Morton Arboretum's 14 year coverage of the problem, summed up in their bulletin.

 

What we wonder here is whether you've stumbled on this problem as we first did. If so, it seems we should all be telling more people to look for it. Perhaps if we talk about it here we might see it very early and perhaps stop it from ruining a garden for roses for the long haul.

 



#2 MG gal

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 09:52 AM

I have seen the rose disease at MSU Tollgate Farm in Novi.  Several roses have been removed.  I believe that they have started a miticide spray program.

 

It's hard to know how many roses have been infected before the disease was recognized.  I have some photos but can't seem to post them.  I took them with my phone.

Ah - here they are:

Needlerose_rosetteS.jpg

NeedleRoseRosette2s.jpg



#3 Janet Macunovich

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 11:01 AM

To post photos: When you are here typing in a reply,

1) Click the "More Reply Options" button, lower right.

2) A window opens that lets you
3) "Browse" for the photo file,

4) "Attach This File" it to upload it,

5) then set your cursor in your message where you want it added and "Add to Post".

(There are some nuances, such as smaller photos load more quickly, and how much resolution is enough, if you downsize a photo to post it.... Steven has a step by step how to post photos here.)

 

That looks like "it", Priscilla. The very red new growth that usually only happens in the cold spring, the bunching, witch's brooming, bits dying...

 

We hope everyone knows about the great option now when trying to see if we have a given plant or problem, to use a Search engine clicked to "images" to type in a plant scientific name, plant disease name or even the symptoms. Man, compared to the hours of book-searching we used to have to do...

roseRosetteImagSearch.jpg

 

We'll check with Tollgate farm manager Roy Prentice to see what the word is on using miticide there -- if anyone has noted results, or there's any way to track that. What we've heard and read so far says that it's not an effective control. But as with all things that are relatively new "in the field" we are the ones taking the recommendations from scientists and figuring out what really works and doesn't.

 

(I should also go start another topic to discuss/groan about all the new pests -- insects, mites, fungi, bacteria, viruses -- that we have to deal with since the continent and the world opened up. Interstate highways, in-a-day international transfer of live plants, free trade, huge volume of goods crossing borders so that they can't all be inspected... all accelerating the spread of foreign species. Given all this and lining it up against advances in plant material and tools, would Grandma and Grampa of pre-WWII gardening time think today's garden world better or worse?)



#4 MG gal

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 04:30 PM

rose disease thorns.jpg I found another photo of a Tollgate rose.  There is excessive thorns on the new growth.  I believe that is also a sign of the rose rosette disease.



#5 Janet Macunovich

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 02:00 AM

I feel so sorry for these roses, being aggravated to produce all these strange growths.

Although it's one of those relative things -- some old roses are naturally as bristly as that cane you shot. So it's perfect that you included the normal cane in the background!



#6 ann521

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 10:30 AM

It was discovered three springs ago on pink Carpet Roses in my church's landscaping in Plymouth.  A member from the Michigan Rose Society kindly came out to take a look after I contacted the MRS and indicated what I thought was going on.  I was informed our outbreak of the disease was the first in the area--what a sad "honor".  Being told there was no cure, we removed all the shrubs in hopes of preventing further spread in the community......I don't know whether or not we were successful. 



#7 suebee

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 02:09 PM

I have been seeing Rose rosette disease (which I first heard of by Googling "witches broom on roses" after I saw weird growth on roses planted in front of my daughter's condo in Ann Arbor) on Multiflora rose on our private road and in natural areas near where we live north of Chelsea and at the Matthaei Botanical Garden.  I have read that left unchecked it will kill the plant within 2 years.  While I happy to have it kill off the Multiflora rose (which I have also been cutting and herbiciding the stumps on our property), it is sad that it will also kill cultivated and native roses.



#8 Lee

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 09:40 AM

It was a  relief/sad to finally find out what was has been plaguing my New Dawn climber for the last year.  The feathery new growth and excessive growth of thorns, weird thickening of canes, and drying of buds.   This climber is 6 yrs old and was previously a very vigorous plant.  Interesting--I live in Plymouth, too.



#9 b00ch0u

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 10:41 AM

I just removed a rose I planted in 2010. It was a "Big Hip Rose" Apple Rose, Rosa pomifera-villosa. I had wanted this plant for the wildlife as it did have big hips. I saw the odd growth, excessive thorns, light green growth in fall. I want to disinfect my pruners and loppers that I used and thought a refresher on the solution that would kill the virus that is on the blades would be helpful. Thanks.

 

Pat






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