Jump to content


Photo

Remember 2012's frosted, wilted Japanese Maples?

Trees

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 gardenlady

gardenlady

    Breaking Bud

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 04 May 2012 - 07:55 AM

Our Ogon Sarasa Japanese Maple leafed out beautifully this spring (planted last fall) then got hit by the frost last week -- the leaves are all wilted looking and some have brown areas (tried to upload picture but upload function not working). We've been watering the tree but wonder if the tree will recover? Grow new leaves? What else should we be doing to ensure it's survival -- fertilize?

#2 Greenie

Greenie

    Breaking Bud

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 09 May 2012 - 05:25 PM

My Japanese maple which has been there for more than 20 years also leafed out nicely but the frost spell makes the tree look like it's October. I know the leaves are sensitive and may have just not been able to handle our bizarre winter/spring this year. Also was wondering if it will have new growth this year or whether I just have to wait until next year?

#3 Janet Macunovich

Janet Macunovich

    Guru

  • Moderators
  • 480 posts

Posted 15 May 2012 - 10:37 PM

We made this the lead article in our What's Up #179, and we'll report again -- we're watching a number of maples for when new growth is apparent, and we'll prune as needed. We expect to see the trees push out new growth in another week or two (3-4 weeks after the loss).

Trees that lost all their foliage may push out new growth from under the bark, sooner than those that lost only some leaves.

How strongly they come back depends on the tree's prior condition, site, and type.

Everything's a guess but we have high hopes for many of these trees.

We do hope people who read our newsletter will tell others with Japanese maples hit by the cold, to wait and see... We've heard of a number of Japanese maples that have been pulled out as dead -- including large, well-established trees that are exactly the ones most likely to be able to come back!

#4 Patwellhausen

Patwellhausen

    Breaking Bud

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 22 May 2012 - 09:08 AM

We put the hose to work immediately and are seeing new red leaves popping up. So glad!! Almost wish the two cut leaf trees in the front of the house had lost their leaves as we.. The were hit, but not drastically and the leaves didn't fall, but are speckled with frost damage. It's been interesting to see the result of our strange winter and spring weather in the gardens.

#5 MG gal

MG gal

    Well Established

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 35 posts
  • LocationW. Bloomfield, MI

Posted 22 May 2012 - 03:41 PM

I just checked 2 of our Japanese maples that were hard hit by the frost. Both have new leaves emerging. Hooray!

#6 Cricket

Cricket

    Well Established

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 51 posts
  • LocationSE MI

Posted 01 June 2012 - 06:56 PM

Returning home following the winds of last weekend I wondered aloud as to why our dwarf (a misnomer) Japanese maple suddenly looked so full - Akin to having two crowns...

Along with having what seems to be the requisite frost damaged shriveled brown leaves all the rage this year- the top third of the tree snapped off and landed in a crook within what was left of the foliage.
ARRRG !!! :angry:

Am at a loss as to how to even begin to address the condition of the tree.... :unsure:


#7 Steven Nikkila

Steven Nikkila

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 154 posts
  • LocationSE Michigan

Posted 05 June 2012 - 05:52 PM

The first step we would take is remove all of the dead and damaged wood from the tree. Once the 'debris' is put of the way you can then assess them remaining tree. Are the damaged leaf twigs leaving out yet? Is the crown in good shape or will it need pruning to help it regain it's shape? It may just need a pruning for shape or it could require a major restructuring. If you feel you can't evaluate the tree properly consult a certified arborist in your area.

#8 Cricket

Cricket

    Well Established

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 51 posts
  • LocationSE MI

Posted 06 June 2012 - 05:24 PM

Probably did as much damage removing the snapped off crown as the actual happening caused...

The crown is totally gone - tree kinda looks like an opened umbrella or a weeping cherry now...

Will consider the ideas you offer as we assess what's left of our tree and wait for signs of new growth....

#9 Janet Macunovich

Janet Macunovich

    Guru

  • Moderators
  • 480 posts

Posted 10 June 2012 - 06:17 PM

Can you send a/some photo/s, Cricket? We're working right now on some ideas to help a person who lost half of a Japanese maple in a windstorm in March, a near-tornado event. If we can see yours maybe some of what we're doing re that other tree, will transfer and vice versa.
One thing in the tree's favor. Japanese maples grow faster than people give them credit for - if they were healthy to begin with they can fill in from a lot of damage in a couple of years. But we know it can be hard to handle the interim look.

#10 Janet Macunovich

Janet Macunovich

    Guru

  • Moderators
  • 480 posts

Posted 30 June 2012 - 09:49 PM

Important July move for anyone in the drought belt:
If your Japanese maple suffered a leaf loss set back this spring, please water it now. Steven and I tend to let plants in our own landscape fend for themselves, and let the strongest and most tolerant prevail. But we make exceptions for special plants and this year many of these trees really need it. Some have such thin crowns you can see through them. Water may help them keep what little leaf they have, and produce the "July push" of new growth -- foliage they can really use.

Currently listing some drought considerations in the What's Up section of the site...

Including: Good reason to pay close attention to tomatoes and potatoes. Trying to keep the moisture even to prevent blossom end rot of the tomatoes and ruination of the tubers-just-forming-now. I mean, shoot, we put a lot into these one-year-or-bust plants and are really looking forward to at least some harvest.


#11 Janet Macunovich

Janet Macunovich

    Guru

  • Moderators
  • 480 posts

Posted 09 August 2012 - 01:13 PM

August 9: Almost hate to report this, but we said we'd watch and write about 'em:

Looking at the affected trees now, in the season when we most often prune them, we're pretty worried. Usually now we're removing without concern a significant percentage of the foliage every couple of years as we clip to keep them small. Not this year. This year we're seeing so much dead wood, and in many cases new growth that erupted from dormant buds on the wood but never filled out. Those in gardens seem to have fared a bit better, on average -- compared to those just out there in a yard. Probably the first bunch benefited from the extra water given to the garden.

It may not be too late to water now, to help the trees be able to set aside enough starch to make it through winter. Yet we're getting a bad feeling about it. Unless they see an incredibly long fall and mild winter, we think more than a few of them are going to die completely.

As for the luckier ones, phew, there will be a lot of tedious work to do next April before budbreak, to remove all the dead wood and reestablish a clean framework of branches.

#12 Janet Macunovich

Janet Macunovich

    Guru

  • Moderators
  • 480 posts

Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:46 AM

Just wanted to say that the 2013 winter so far has not been the kind we'd hope for, to help these trees recover. Very warm spells followed by very cold are very tough on thin-barked trees like this. The cambium warms up during the day, metabolism increases and cells plump up by reabsorbing water shed during fall hardening-off, and then those cells burst when the temperature falls suddenly. So this is not the gentle recovery time that would have helped trees with cambium already damaged in Spring 2012's early warm-up followed by freezes. There's little we can do to protect them, but we are putting off February thaw pruning until late March, when we'll be better able to tell if a limb is dead or alive. No sense pruning for form if we shape around what turns out to be dead!







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Trees

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users